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GitHub Enterprise Repositories

Note

GitHub Enterprise support requires a license of Power Pack. You can download a trial license or purchase a license for your team.

Review Board supports posting and reviewing code on GitHub Enterprise repositories, using public or private personal repositories or organization-owned repositories.

Existing commits in a repository can be browsed and put up for review. Pull requests, however, are not currently supported (though planned for a future release).

To simplify posting changes to Review Board, we recommend using RBTools. This ensures that the diffs are in the correct format, and makes managing review requests much easier. See Using RBTools with Git for more information.

Adding the Repository

To configure a GitHub Enterprise repository, first proceed to add the repository and select GitHub Enterprise from the Hosting type field.

Step 2: Provide Repository Information

Next, you’ll need to fill out the following fields:

Repository plan:

This specifies the type of the repository, whether it’s public/private or personal/team. You’ll have one of the following choices:

  • Public: The repository is owned by the linked user account, and is publicly-accessible to any user.
  • Public Organization: The repository is owned by an organization, and is publicly accessible to any user.
  • Private: The repository is owned by the linked user account, and is accessible only to the linked user and other GitHub Enterprise users who were granted permission.
  • Private Organization: The repository is owned by an organization, and is accessible only to the linked user and other GitHub Enterprise users who were granted permission.

Note

The public/private options have no bearing on who can access review requests on this repository in Review Board. See Step 4: Manage Access Control.

Organization name:
If you’re using an organization-based plan, you will need to specify the organization name in the Organization name field. This is the same value you would find in the URL. For example, if your repository was https://github.example.com/myorg/myrepo/, your organization name would be myorg.
Repository name:
You’ll then need to specify the name of your repository in the Repository name field. This is the same value you would find in the URL. In the above example, your repository name would be myrepo.

Step 3: Choose a Bug Tracker

If you’re using the issue tracking feature on this repository, you can simply check the Use hosting service’s bug tracker checkbox. All bug IDs will link to the appropriate issues for your repository.

If you’re using a separate bug tracker, or a separate repository on GitHub Enterprise, you can leave the checkbox unchecked and choose a bug tracker from the list.

Learn more about bug tracker configuration.

Step 4: Manage Access Control

You can now choose who should have access to this repository (both posting against it and viewing review requests posted against it). This is separate from GitHub Enterprise’s own access controls.

Learn more about access control.

Step 5: Save the Repository

At this point, you should be able to save the repository. If saving succeeds, you’re done! You can start posting changes for review.

Configuring Repository Hooks

Review Board can close review requests automatically when pushing commits to GitHub Enterprise. This is done by configuring a WebHook and pointing it to your Review Board server, and then referencing the review request in your commit message (which is done for you when using rbt land).

Let’s go over how to set this up.

Add the WebHook

On Review Board, view the list of repositories and locate the repository you want to configure hooks for. Beside the repository name, you’ll see a Hooks link. Click that and you’ll see instructions for configuring the hook.

../../../../_images/hooks2.png

The instructions will contain a link taking you to the page on GitHub Enterprise for adding a new WebHook, along with all the information you need in order to add the hook. Simply follow the instructions and you’ll be ready to go.

Tag Your Commit Messages

To close a review request for a given commit, you’ll need to add some special text to your commit message that references the review request. This can be in the form of Reviewed at review_request_url or Review request #id. This must be on its own line, but can appear anywhere in the commit message.

For example:

Reviewed at https://reviewboard.example.com/r/123/

Or:

Review request #123

If you use rbt land, this will be automatically added for you when landing your changes.